San Diego Comic-Con 2016: Recap and Photo Highlights

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Reports on San Diego Comic-Con always read like the story of the blind men describing an elephant. The scope of the event is so broad, its scale so large, that each attendee can only experience a small sliver of the long weekend’s activities.

This was Comic-Con International: San Diego 2016 from my perspective.

Because of my interest in the media marketing that accompanies Comic-Con, Wednesday afternoon before Preview Night provided a good opportunity to explore the branding and the media installations around the Convention Center and throughout San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter.

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Virtually entering the world of ‘Mr. Robot’.

Virtual reality was a major presence at Comic-Con this year, both at promotional events and at a separate mini-conference dubbed VR Con at the Con. A number of the large-scale marketing “activations” (as industry insiders like to call them) featured a virtual reality experience in combination with an impressive physical environment. Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle experience included a museum of set pieces from the program and an interactive VR experience using the HTC Vive. To promote USA Network’s cult favorite Mr. Robot, the network created a detailed reconstruction of the Mr. Robot repair shop and the apartment of the show’s main character, Elliot Alderson. Inside the apartment you could enter a 13-minute virtual reality experience written and directed by Mr. Robot creator Sam Email. [For more on the Mr. Robot Virtual Reality Experience, see “The Mr. Robot VR Experience, Storytelling, and the Future of Immersive Media.”]

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Crowds fill the exhibition hall floor on Preview Night.

Back in the real world, it was time to head to the Convention Center for the official opening of the con with Preview Night. For many, Preview Night is a mad rush to get first dibs on exclusive collectible items. I use it as an opportunity to visit the comic book creators in Artist Alley and elsewhere before the crush of the crowds in the subsequent days of the con. [See, “Be a Con-trarian: Go Against the Flow at Comic-Con.”] While San Diego Comic-Con attracts numerous high-profile movie and TV celebrities, I always enjoy the opportunity to meet the men and women who write, draw, and publish the comic books that form the basis of so much of our popular culture.

After Preview Night, it was off to Analog Bar for the annual Enchantment Under the SDCC party hosted by the SDCC Unofficial Blog.

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The show’s cast immersed in the Mr. Robot Virtual Reality Experience.

Thursday began with a second opportunity to experience Sam Email’s immersive Mr. Robot 360-degree film. Rather than taking place in the reconstruction of Elliot’s apartment, this second viewing was in Petco Park with cast members Rami Malek, Christian Slater, Portia Doubleday, Carly Chaikin, and Grace Gummer viewing the virtual experience along with the audience. At one point, while the audience members were still in the virtual world, Malek left the stage and sat in the crowd, surprising the adjacent audience members once the simulation ended.

First Timers and Old Regulars

Given the 47-year history of San Diego Comic-Con, it’s surprising to discover major popular culture icons who have never attended the event. This year a number of notable artists made their first appearances at San Diego Comic-Con.

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Oliver Stone and Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

Oliver Stone made his inaugural appearance at Comic-Con to promote his forthcoming film, Snowden, along with cast members Gordon-Levitt, Shailene Woodley, and Zachary Quinto.

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Luc Besson.

Similarly new to Comic-Con this year was Luc Besson, who brought producer Virginie Besson-Silla and actors Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevingne to present concept artwork and early footage from his film Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets. Comic-Con International Senior Director of Programming Eddie Ibrahim presented Besson with an Inkpot award for his contributions to popular culture.

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William Gibson.

Also appearing at Comic-Con for the first time was famed cyberpunk writer William Gibson. Gibson also received a Comic-Con International Inkpot award for his contributions to science fiction.

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Dark Horse Presents: Conversations with Joss Whedon.

In contrast to these Comic-Con newcomers, Friday brought back to Hall H longtime fan favorite, writer/director Joss Whedon, who answered audience questions and hinted at future projects. He gave scant details about his current project, other than to say it was something new — neither a sequel nor a franchise piece. In response to an audience question, he reiterated his intention to eventually produce a follow-up to Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, stating it would not be a prequel but, rather, focus on events following the original series. Work on this project isn’t imminent, however, since other members of the creative team (like Jed Whedon and Maurissa Tancheron) are currently busy with other projects.

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Trey Parker and Matt Stone discuss ‘South Park’.

Following Whedon, South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone discussed their 20 years of working on the animated series, moderated by host Chris Hardwick.

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The Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards.

Friday evening always brings the annual Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards ceremony, honoring the work of comic book writers, artists, and publishers. With industry notables and surprise guests, the event is always a high point of Comic-Con for me each year.

Big Shows in Hall H on Saturday

While each day in Hall H brings panels with notable celebrity appearances and exclusive content, Saturday is the day coveted by the major studios for their showpiece events.

With a number of major movie studios, including 20th Century Fox, Paramount Studios, and Sony Pictures, skipping Hall H this year, on Saturday the room was dominated by two studios: Warner Bros. at the start of the day and Marvel Studios at day’s end (before the annual Kevin Smith panel). It’s worth noting that although they skipped Hall H, Paramount made a big splash in San Diego this year with the world premiere of Star Trek Beyond, Sony brought a Sausage Party screening and cast appearance to the Horton Grand Theatre, and Fox television programming had a significant presence at Comic-Con.

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Eddie Redmayne distributes magic wands in Hall H.

Arriving late in Hall H that day, I missed most of the Warner Bros. panel. As I entered the cavernous room near the end of the WB presentation, I almost ran into Eddie Redmayne as he raced around the floor handing out magic wands to fans to promote Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

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Cast member celebrate the 50th anniversary of ‘Star Trek’.

After Warner Bros., the panel celebrating the 50th anniversary of the original Star Trek television series brought together cast members from several generations of the TV series: William Shatner, Brent Spiner, Michael Dorn, Jeri Ryan, and Scott Bakula in a session moderated by Bryan Fuller, showrunner and co-creator of CBS’ new forthcoming Star Trek series.

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Cast and crew celebrate the 30th anniversary of ‘Aliens’.

The panel following Star Trek marked another anniversary of a popular science fiction franchise: the 30th anniversary of Aliens. On stage for the event were Aliens writer/director James Cameron, producer Gale Anne Hurd, and cast members Sigourney Weaver, Bill Paxton, Lance Henriksen, Paul Reiser, Michael Biehn, and Carrie Henn (who portrayed Newt in the film).

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Melissa Benoist and Morena Baccarin on the Entertainment Weekly: Women Who Kick Ass panel.

Next up in Hall H was the annual Entertainment Weekly: Women Who Kick Ass panel moderated by EW’s Nicole Sperling, featuring an array of women who portray strong female roles on television and the movies: Morena Baccarin, Melissa Benoist, Nathalie Emmanuel, Lucy Lawless, Tatian Maslany, Connie Nielsen, and Ming-Na Wen.

Marvel Studios then capped the day with a session that featured cast members and exclusive clips from several of the company’s upcoming feature films introduced by Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige and moderated by the ever-present Chris Hardwick.

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The director and cast of ‘Black Panther’.

Appearing first was the director and cast of Black Panther: director Ryan Coogler and actors Lupita Nyong’o, Michael B. Jordan, Danai Gurira, and Chadwick Boseman.

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‘Doctor Strange’ cast members Benedict Cumberbatch, Tilda Swinton, and Rachel McAdams.

Smoke then filled the stage and sides of the auditorium along with abstract patterns of projected light. The smoke cleared to reveal Doctor Strange actor Benedict Cumberbatch at center stage. Joining Cumberbatch was Doctor Strange director Scott Derrickson and cast members Tilda Swinton, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams, Mads Mikkelsen, Clyde Kusatsu. The Doctor Strange presentation included new footage and the debut of a new trailer.

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The cast of ‘Spider-Man Homecoming’.

Next up was Spider-Man Homecoming actor Tom Holland, joined by director Jon Watts and cast members Laura Harrier, Tony Revolori, Jacob Batalon, and Zendaya. A brief comedic video segment showed scenes of Peter Parker trying to balance his daily life at school with his responsibilities as a superhero.

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The cast of ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’.

Director James Gunn next took the stage — along a cadre of fully-costumed Ravengers — for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Gunn then introduced cast members Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Karen Gillan, Dave Bautista, Elizabeth Debicki, and Kurt Russell (who was revealed to be playing Peter Quill’s father). Gunn also announced that Disney would be opening a theme park attraction based on the Guardians of the Galaxy franchise. The Hall H crowd also saw a clip from the film and a new trailer.

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Brie Larson joins the Marvel family as Captain Marvel.

Finally, Feige confirmed the long-held rumor that Brie Larson would play Captain Marvel in the movie slated for Phase Three of the Marvel Cinematic Universe films. Larson joined the cast members from all the films for a Marvel family portrait.

Wrapping Up on Sunday

Sunday provided the opportunity to visit some of the marketing activations I hadn’t yet seen, including the Timeless time travel ride (built around that old amusement park classic, the Gravitron), Adult Swim on the Green, and the Son of Zorn rock climb and giant leap into an air bag (the latter pair of which I merely observed rather than participating in). After the virtual reality experiences of Mr. Robot and The Man in the High Castle, these decidedly non-virtual activities were an interesting change of pace.

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Moved from its original 480-seat room, the Pokémon GO panel fills the 6,500-seat Hall H.

Sunday’s final Hall H panel was originally slated for a much smaller room. Back in April 2016, Comic-Con International was coordinating with gaming company Niantic to present a panel on their augmented reality game Ingress. When the programming schedule for Comic-Con 2016 was released — as usual, just two weeks before the event — Niantic was scheduled to speak about Ingress and a new game they planned to launch, Pokémon GO. Shortly afterwards, Pokémon GO debuted and quickly became the hottest thing on Internet. Comic-Con International quickly changed the schedule to move the panel from its Thursday time slot in a modest 480-seat room to the last available spot on Sunday in the 6,500-seat Hall H. While this initially seemed like overkill, it proved otherwise. The enormous auditorium was packed on Sunday afternoon.

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Niantic CEO John Hanke addresses the Hall H crowd.

Host Chris Hardwick interviewed Niantic’s CEO, John Hanke for the session. Fans’ expectations that Hall H events bring big surprises caused many to assume that a special, rare Pokémon creature would appear in the hall for attendees to capture. But, alas, CEO Hanke seemed somewhat taken aback by the amped up expectations of the Hall H crowd, and no special creatures were to be found.

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Comic-Con International President John Rogers ready to respond to fans at the Talk Back session.

As in past years, my final session at Comic-Con was the Talk Back session in which Comic-Con International president John Rogers responds to questions and complaints from attendees. This year, Rogers and Comic-Con International Director of Programming Eddie Ibrahim made a valiant effort to keep the session on schedule, only running roughly 15 minutes over the allotted one hour time slot in contrast to the two-plus hour sessions in past years. While the Talk Back can be a rather dour way to end the con, it offers insights into the choices made by Comic-Con International in running the complex event. For a good recap of the key points from this year’s Talk Back session, see the report from ConShark.

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One final look before saying farewell to Comic-Con 2016.

After the Talk Back, one final glance at the crowds streaming out of the Convention Center and it was a wrap for San Diego Comic-Con 2016.

For the complete photo gallery from Comic-Con International 2016, see the Flickr photo album: San Diego Comic-Con 2016:

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[Click to view photo gallery]

The Mr. Robot VR Experience, Storytelling, and the Future of Immersive Media

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Virtual reality was a significant presence in the marketing experiences at Comic-Con International: San Diego this year. Both at the booths inside the Convention Center and the offsite events throughout downtown San Diego, a number of movie studios, television networks, and video game companies presented VR experiences designed to generate buzzworthy excitement in attendees. From Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle to Adult Swim’s Rick and Morty to Rocksteady’s Batman Arkham VR, fans throughout Comic-Con were donning virtual reality headsets.

Among the most impressive of these was the Mr. Robot Virtual Reality Experience written and directed by Mr. Robot creator and showrunner Sam Esmail, and developed for USA Network by Here Be Dragons and Within.

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Rows of fans immersed in the Mr. Robot VR experience in Petco Park.

For an advertising piece, the VR experience ran a surprisingly long 13 minutes. One of the constraints of this type of marketing event is throughput — the number of people who can cycle through the event each hour. Of course, Sam Esmail is famous for turning in episodes of the Mr. Robot television program that run longer than their intended time slot, even going so far as to apologize on Twitter recently for doing so.

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Cast members view the Mr. Robot VR experience at Petco Park.

The Mr. Robot VR Experience was available from several locations during San Diego Comic-Con, including in white Uber vans designed to resemble Mr. Robot repair vehicles driving around the Gaslamp Quarter and at an event with the show’s cast at Petco Park. It was also broadcast live during the Petco Park event, allowing fans not attending Comic-Con to share the experience (in what an NBC/Universal press release described as “largest-ever co-viewing virtual reality simulcast event”). Subsequently, the VR segment has been made available for on-demand viewing on home devices, mobile phones, and desktop systems.

The most effective venue for the virtual reality experience, however, was a pop-up installation constructed in downtown San Diego that featured a physical, real-world environment that cleverly blended with the virtual content.

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The sign above the Mr. Robot repair shop in downtown San Diego for Comic-Con.

USA Network converted the exterior of a downtown San Diego building into a recreation of the Mr. Robot repair shop run by Elliot’s late father in the show. On entering the building, circa mid-1990s era computers, parts, and advertisements continue the illusion. A corridor at the rear of the shop leads to another room, a reconstruction of Elliot’s apartment as seen in the show. While waiting for a VR headset to free up, you can explore the details of Elliot’s life scattered around the room: his desktop computer, circuit boards, and even bills from New York City utility companies. This is familiar territory, a place we’ve seen many times in the television show.

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From inside a reconstruction of Elliot’s apartment, you enter the virtual world…

After taking a seat and putting on a Samsung Gear headset and a pair of headphones, the real world is replaced by the virtual. The virtual environment you initially enter is, somewhat surprisingly, Elliot’s apartment — essentially identical to the physical location in which you’re actually sitting. There’s a noteworthy exception, however: As you turn your head, Elliot (played by Rami Malek) is sitting beside you.

While narratively working as a flashback — the video covers events that occurred before the time frame of show’s first season — it is, in fact, a contemporary memory. We’re experiencing Elliot’s current recollections of a much earlier event.

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…the virtual world of Elliot’s apartment with Elliot sitting next to you.

The voice we hear, Rami Malek’s Elliot, is the voice inside his head. As he does in the TV show, Elliot is simultaneously thinking to himself and narrating his inner thoughts to us, his ever-present, but unseen, companion.

Elliot is about to go on a first date with Shayla, a character we know from the first season of the show. In those TV episodes, Shayla is Elliot’s friend, drug supplier, and occasional lover. In the VR experience, Elliot is recalling their first encounter and how deeply he wants to avoid seeing her, how painful he finds these artificially-constructed social situations.

As Elliot smokes a joint, the camera floats upward toward the ceiling and we now view the scene from this more disengaged perspective. We follow Elliot and Shayla on their date to Coney Island and join them as they ride on a Ferris wheel, the VR simulation providing a dramatic 360-degree view of the surroundings. As their relationship grows closer, the scene melds into an abstract sequence with the two characters dancing in silhouette against a color-shifting background. Finally we return back to the “reality” of the apartment in the virtual world — and, again, in the real world when we remove the Samsung Gear headsets.

In its 13 minutes, Esmail’s piece runs the gamut from realistically grounded to surrealistically untethered and back again. As the locations change throughout the piece, the mood swings from reticence to euphoria to tragic loss.

The Mr. Robot VR video assumes we’re familiar with season 1 of the show, and uses that information as a backstory to make an immediate emotional connection. (Spoiler alert if you haven’t seen the first season of Mr. Robot.) Because of what we know of the series, Shayla’s plea for Elliot to remember her gains a profoundly melancholy dimension. We, like Elliot, feel sorrow and desperation as he struggles to hold on to his recollection of her as his memory falters and fades. It’s an emotionally powerful moment.

Aside from being a compelling VR experience, Email’s piece also an example of the power of transmedia storytelling. While based on what we know about the television series, it expands the narrative into new territory. It offers new details on the relationship between Elliot and Shayla and adds emotional depth to his feelings of loss and guilt. It’s a powerful work that both stands on its own as a self-contained 13-minute vignette and adds additional depth to television episodes.

Whatever it may indicate about the possibilities of VR for media marketing, the Mr. Robot Virtual Reality Experience may also point to the future of rich, multi-threaded storytelling across different media.

The image from the Mr. Robot Virtual Reality Experience is from a copyrighted film, the copyright for which is most likely owned by the film’s production company and/or distributor and possibly also by any actors appearing in the image. It is believed that the use of a web-resolution screenshot for identification and critical commentary on the film and its contents qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law.

Comic-Con: Glimpse the Future in the Smaller Rooms

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There’s a joyful nostalgia in looking back at photos from previous comic cons, recalling the clever cosplay, the rousing panel sessions and celebrity appearances, and the encounters with friends old and new. I’m also struck by how often the creators of hugely popular movies, TV shows, and comic books — people who now fill the largest rooms at the con — were, just a few years ago, appearing in modestly attended panels in small, intimate rooms.

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Felicia Day at San Diego Comic-Con 2011

At Comic-Con International: San Diego in 2011, Felicia Day headlined the panel on “The Evolution of Web Series: The Guild to Dragon Age” in a moderately sized 480-seat room. Seated in the audience with the fans were Kim Evey, the producer of Day’s popular web series The Guild, and The Guild actors Jeff Lewis and Sandeep Parikh. After the panel session, Lewis and Parikh lingered in the hallway posing for photos with fans.

Felicia Day has returned to San Diego Comic-Con in subsequent years, hosting panels in progressively larger venues. This year, as with last year, Day along with friends and colleagues from her production company Geek and Sundry will hold court in the 2663-seat Indigo Ballroom and host offset events in Petco Park.

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Gareth Edwards talks ‘Monsters’ at New York Comic Con 2010.

At ReedPop’s  New York Comic Con 2010 , director Gareth Edwards played clips from his first feature film, Monsters, in a small room, sparsely filled with attendees. Following the presentation, Edwards hung around the Magnet Releasing booth, chatting with anyone who stopped by. With a minimal production budget, the film grossed $4,242,978 worldwide and catapulted Edwards to Hollywood, where he directed the 2014 blockbuster Godzilla, which amassed a worldwide gross of $529,076,069. Edwards is currently directing the next installment in the Star Wars franchise, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

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Rainn Wilson and James Gunn discuss ‘Super’ at WonderCon 2011.

At WonderCon 2011 (San Diego Comic-Con’s sister event in San Francisco), director James Gunn was joined by Rainn Wilson in a medium-sized panel room to discuss their upcoming film, Super.

Later than evening, Gunn introduced a free screening of the film. Plenty of seats were available for last-minute, walk-in attendees. The film grossed a modest $327,716 on a budget of $2.5 million. Yet Gunn’s quirky directorial style effectively navigated the film’s shifts in tone from broad comedy to fierce action-drama, and led to his next major project: helming Marvel’s summer mega-hit Guardians of the Galaxy, which pulled in a worldwide gross of $773,312,399.

At this year’s San Diego Comic-Con, Gunn is expected to be back again, introducing the cast of Guardians of the Galaxy 2 in the event’s largest venue, the 6,500-seat Hall H. Unlike at WonderCon five years earlier, when walking in at the beginning of the session was sufficient to secure a seat, gaining access to Hall H on Saturday this year — which includes major presentations by Warner Bros. and Marvel Studios, among others — will likely require camping out in line starting Friday Night.

Each year’s Comic-Con includes pop culture creators poised to shake up the world with their forthcoming projects. My advice: Rather than camping out for hours in hopes of entering Hall H at San Diego Comic-Con, check out some of the events in the smaller rooms. You might gain an early glimpse of the future.

 

Wall Writers: Graffiti in its Innocence

Wall-Writers-1020x492The Writing on the Wall: New York and Philly in the Early 1970s

Before the politically adroit stencils of Banksy, the beautiful calligraphic designs of Retna, and the clever humanoid figures of stikman, most graffiti consisted of simple tagging. Writing your name — or, more commonly, your nickname — on as many locations as possible was the obsession of many urban teenagers in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Graffiti had not yet acquired the aesthetic characteristics that would later cause it to be dubbed “street art.” It was then simply about getting your name seen as widely as possible.

Roger Gastman’s documentary Wall Writers recounts this era when, as the film’s subtitle states, graffiti was in its innocence. Combining contemporary interviews with period photographs and film clips, the movie focuses on the men and women in New York and Philadelphia who were graffiti’s early proponents. Narrated by John Waters, the movie provides a lively account of the personalities and activities at the dawn of modern graffiti.

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Q&A following ‘Wall Writers’ at International House Philadelphia.

The film’s debut Philadelphia screening at International House this past Saturday featured appearances by director Gastman and a number of the graffiti writers profiled in the movie, including Philadelphia’s Cool Earl, Cornbread, Kool Klepto Kid, Karate, and Lewis, and New York’s Wicked Gary.

In addition to covering the personalities involved in the early graffiti movement, Gastman’s documentary shows how the practice evolved from simple tagging — just getting your name up around the city — to become the foundation of today’s more elaborate graffiti artwork. Ironically, many of the early wall writers didn’t pursue this trend, eventually abandoning their work on the street to move on to other pursuits.

An amusing sequence in Wall Writers shows a series of graffiti writers all claiming to be the first to embellish their signature by adding a crown, marking a key historical moment when the practice began to morph from simply writing a name to embracing aesthetic flourishes. But claims of originality are impossible to verify for a medium with scant documentation and diverse local practices that evolved independently.

Whether the honor of being the birthplace of modern graffiti goes to New York or Philadelphia remains equally ambiguous — although the loyalties of the Philadelphia crowd at Saturday’s screening were apparent from the audience’s response.

Gastman’s film laments a certain loss of purity as graffiti became more widely recognized as an aesthetic activity. Art dealers moved in and co-opted the works of many young writers, in some cases providing them with free access to the tools to perform their craft, but without letting them share in the profits from their efforts.

By the mid-1980s, when Taki 183 sees his moniker echoed in the mainstream Hollywood film Turk 182, it was clear that while graffiti’s public profile was rising, its role as an underground cult movement was changing.

Following the screening at International House, Gastman moderated a question and answer session with several of the individuals portrayed in the film, now looking older and more reflective than the impetuous youth seen in the movie. Following the Q&A, long lines formed for a signing with these participants and others featured in Gastman’s companion book about the film.

Gastman’s film and book provide lively insights into the personalities and practices of the early days of the modern graffiti movement. Now, many decades after their activity on the streets, these men and women are receiving recognition far beyond their youthful dreams of being known around the neighborhood.

The top image from Wall Writers is from a copyrighted film and book, the copyright for which is most likely owned by the film’s production company and/or distributor and/or the book’s publisher and possibly also by any people appearing in the image. It is believed that the use of a web-resolution screenshot for identification and critical commentary qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law.

Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con 2016: Recap and Photo Highlights

Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con 2016. Photo by Kendall Whitehouse.

This past weekend, the sixteenth Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con presented a four-day festival of pop culture entertainment. Traditionally the second largest event hosted by Wizard World (second only to the one in Chicago), this year’s Philadelphia event featured panel sessions and autograph opportunities with a roster of celebrities from popular movies and television shows.

Wizard World CEO: “Amping it Up”

Wizard World CEO John Maata.
CEO Maatta: “Amping it up.”

It’s been a challenging year for Wizard World, Inc. After showing a profit of $995,000 in 2014, the company lost $4.25 million in 2015. This past April, Wizard World Entertainment president and CEO John Macaluso stepped down and was replaced by John Maatta as president and CEO, with Paul Kessler appointed as chairman of the board.

After expanding from 17 shows in 2014 to 25 in 2015, the company’s revenue per show fell from $1.36 million per show in 2014 to $916,000 per show in 2015. Wizard World recently trimmed its investment in streaming platform CONtv, a costly joint venture with Cinedigm, and appears to be cutting back on the number of events it plans to hold this year.

Newly appointed chief executive Maatta, however, appears more focused on doubling down than retrenching. When I asked about his plans to return the company to profitability, Maatta rejected the idea that the business required a course correction, stating he intends to “amp it up” with “better marketing and more content creation.”

The programming during the four days of the Philadelphia event showed no signs of scaling back.

Exhibitors: Artists and Autographs, Comics and Telecom

Thursday is the shortest of the four days of Wizard World Philadelphia, running from 3 PM to 8 PM. Unlike Preview Night at San Diego Comic-Con, during which there are no panel sessions, Wizard World Philadelphia provided a full slate of programming content on the show’s opening day. Nonetheless, Thursday’s relative calm before the arrival of the weekend crowds presented an ideal time to explore the exhibition hall.

Comic books…

As in past years, the show floor included the usual assortment of vendors of comic books, action figures, and pop culture goodies. In previous years, it was jarring to see vendors unaffiliated with popular culture exhibiting at a comic con. [See Knowledge@Wharton, “Consumer Brands Go Geek at Comic Con”  and “Philadelphia Comic Con: Batman, Buffy and … Bath Fitter?“] This is now a common sight at Wizard World shows and, to a lesser extent, at ReedPop’s New York Comic Con as well. Comic-Con International’s San Diego event is an outlier among the larger conventions in keeping the show floor focused exclusively on products related to pop culture.

… and telecom services…

Telecom companies were in abundance at this year’s Wizard World, with booths by Comcast Xfinity, T-Mobile, and Sprint looking to connect with the pop culture audience. Insurance companies, including State Farm and Geico, and home improvement firms, such as Power Home Remodeling and Bath Fitter, were also anxious to attract the attention of the large crowds attending the show.

For fans interesting in comics, however, there were vendors offering single issues, graphic novels, and services such as grading and encapsulation (aka “slabbing”).

…and artists like Bob Camp.

The exhibition hall also included rows of comic book artists and writers available to chat with fans, sign autographs, or create commissioned illustrations. The Philadelphia show included a number of noteworthy comics creators including writer/artist Howard Chaykin, artist Dean Haspiel, and artist J.G. Jones. A row of tables featuring animation illustrators included Bob Camp, Mike Toth, and Tom Cook.

Throughout all four days of the show, a series of live demos by artists provided mini-lessons for aspiring comic book creators.

Friday Panels

Friday’s line-up of programming sessions featured panels on everything from comic books and movies to literature and professional wrestling.

Dean Haspiel, Howard Chaykin, and Danny Fingeroth.

For a panel on “Two Generations of Upstarts” Danny Fingeroth ably attempted to contain Howard Chaykin and Dean Haspiel during a freewheeling conversation filled with colorful anecdotes (often stated in colorful language). The pair spoke about their long working relationship (Haspiel began his career as an assistant to Chaykin) and regaled the audience with tales of working with storied creators such as Gil Kane and Walt Simonson.

Other panels Friday afternoon included the following:

“Diversity in Pop Culture” with Tony B. Kim, Craig Liggeons, Victor Dandridge, Janice Lai, and Chelsea St. Juniors.

Tony B. Kim moderated “I’m Not a sidekick: A Discussion on Diversity in Pop Culture,” with panelists Craig Liggeons, Chelsea St. Juniors, Janice Lai, and Victor Dandridge.

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Sheamus with Mo Lightning.

Mo Lightning led a conversation with WWE wrestler Sheamus.

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Anthony Bueno and Claire Bueno discuss “Cleanin’ Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters.”

Anthony Bueno and Claire Bueno discussed their efforts to produce the documentary, Cleanin’ Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters.

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“Back to the Future” co-writer and co-producer Bob Gale.

In “(Almost) Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Back to the Future,” author Michael Klastorin spoke with Back to the Future co-writer and co-producer Bob Gale about the long road his story took from conception to completion. The initial impetus for the film, Gale explained, arose from the observation that predictions of the future unfailingly miss the mark. Gale showed a series of wildly fabulous — and hugely impractical — images of previous extrapolations of the world of tomorrow. The film’s plot didn’t gel, however, until Gale saw a picture of his father in an old high school yearbook and began to wonder what his father was like as a teenager. What would it have been like to have met him back then, he wondered? Gale and director Robert Zemeckis then began to speculate on what their mothers might have been like in high school, and the basic outline of the screenplay was formed.

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Tony Miello and Bill Pulkovski discuss Edgar Allan Poe.

Tony Miello and Bill Pulkovski from Rocket Ink Studios led a discussion on the continuing influence of the writings of Edgar Allan Poe.

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“Honest Trailers” with Andy Signore, Dan Murrell, and Spencer Gilbert.

Friday concluded with a panel by the “Honest Trailers” team from ScreenJunkies, Andy Signore, Spencer Gilbert, and Dan Murrell. The session featured screenings of a couple of yet-to-be released trailers. The team also discussed their coup in getting Ryan Reynolds to perform in their Honest Trailer for Deadpool.

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Celebrity Saturday

Saturday brought out the big-name talent at a series of celebrity panels, many of which filled the Philadelphia Convention Center’s 4,300-seat Terrace Ballroom. The day offered interviews and audience Q&A sessions for fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, several popular television shows, and one classic film from the 1980s.

“Team Cap”: Anthony Mackie, Sebastian Stan, and Chris Evans.

The day began with three members of Civil War‘s “Team Cap” — Chris Evans, Sebastian Stan, and Anthony Mackie — in conversation with Andy Signore from ScreenJunkies.

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Stephen Amell.

Stephen Amell spoke with Pure Fandom’s Lindi Smith and answered audience questions about his role as Oliver Queen in Arrow, including what to expect in season 5 of the show. Amell also half-jokingly (yet half seriously) encouraged everyone in the audience to see Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, in which he plays Casey Jones.

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Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston.

Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston spoke with Mo Lightning about their roles as warring brothers Thor and Loki. Hemsworth also described playing the quite different and “completely wacky” role of Kevin in the upcoming Ghostbusters film. In response to a question from Hiddleston, Hemsworth admitted that while Thor was one of his greatest acting roles, Kevin was much closer to his actual personality. Hiddleston, for this part, was anxious to downplay rumors that he might be cast as the next James Bond, telling the crowd, “I don’t think that announcement is coming, but I am very gratified to hear the enthusiasm. Your guess is as good as mine, to be honest.”

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“Back to the Future” with Michael J. Fox, Lea Thompson, and Christopher Lloyd.

The Back to the Future panel featured Bob Gale, the co-writer and co-producer of the popular 1985 film, along with actors Michael J. Fox, Lea Thompson, and Christopher Lloyd in conversation with Michael Klastorin, author of Back to the Future: The Ultimate Visual History. Gale described a number of details about the genesis of the film, including the difficulties getting Michael J. Fox for the role of Marty because of his prior commitment to the television show Family Ties.

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David Duchovny, Mitch Pileggi, and William B. Davis with Tony B. Kim.

For fans of The X-Files, actors David Duchovny, Mitch Pileggi, and William B. Davis spoke with moderator Tony B. Kim about the original television program and the recent six-episode revival series.

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Hayley Atwell and Dominic Cooper.

Closing out the day, Pure Fandom’s Liz Prugh hosted the panel with Agent Carter actors Hayley Atwell and Dominic Cooper. While both actors are attached to new series — Cooper’s Preacher and Atwell’s forthcoming Conviction — much of the conversation centered around the recently canceled Marvel’s Agent Carter, with fans expressing the hope that the show might be revived on a platform such as Netflix.

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Creative Cosplay

No con would be complete without seeing costumed characters roaming the hall. Wizard World hosts number of professional cosplayers including Jackie Craft and Brit Bliss. Most of the costumed characters strolling around the venue, however, were fan creations.

Elizabethan Superheroes.

Some clever costumes were mashups from different cultural contexts. A pair of cosplayers who could perhaps be described as Ronald McJoker and Hamburiddler showed a version of McDonald’s characters who might be found stalking Gotham City. Time-shifted Marvel superheroes on the show floor included Elizabethan versions of Captain America, the Winter Soldier, Thor, and Loki.

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For a complete photographic overview of this year’s event, see the Flickr album: Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con 2016

Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con 2016. Photos by Kendall Whitehouse.
[Click to view photo gallery]

Mysteries of the Comic-Con ‘Hotelpocalypse’

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Due to the enormous popularity of San Diego Comic-Con, acquiring a ticket to the annual pop culture event is difficult. If you are lucky enough to snag a ticket, however, getting a hotel room may be even more challenging. In both cases, the demand far outstrips the supply. In the case of hotel rooms, confusion over how the sale process works exacerbates the situation. This past week, the quest to secure rooms for San Diego Comic-Con 2016 — affectionately (or not so affectionately) known as “Hotelpocalypse” — left many attendees confused and frustrated.

When Demand Exceeds Supply: Randomize!

As with most large conventions, Comic Con International, the organization that runs San Diego Comic-Con, arranges for blocks of hotel rooms to be available for attendees throughout San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter and as far away as the airport, Mission Valley, and Coronado Island. This year travel planning agency onPeak managed the annual hotel sale for Comic Con International.

Hilton-Bayfront-SDCC-20150-photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse-480x480While rooms are available outside this system, the high demand drives prices to astronomical levels. When booked through Comic-Con’s travel agency, onPeak, a room at the popular Hilton Bayfront costs $308 per night. (For comparison, on weekends other than that of Comic-Con, rooms at the Bayfront go for as low as $169.) If you book the same room outside of the onPeak sale during the weekend of Comic-Con, the price is $1095 per night (plus the usual taxes and fees). Understandably, many want to acquire rooms through the Comic-Con sale.

To apply for a room, attendees submit a form with their top six hotels choices listed in order of preference, enter their personal data, and specify what should happen if none of their six hotel selections is available: book a room in any hotel on the shuttle route, book a room at any hotel in the area, or discard the request.

In previous years, the form went live at a specified time and requests were processed in the order submitted. It was a mad dash to complete the form as quickly as possible. Getting a room in one of the popular downtown hotels required racing through the multi-section form in less than a minute or two. The high peak demand on the system led to numerous technical problems such as pages not loading or submissions inexplicably lost.

Tickets to San Diego Comic-Con were once similarly allotted on a first-come, first-served basis, with equally problematic results. Two years ago, Comic Con International switched to a system of randomized ticket sales. During a recap of the previous year’s event, CCI President John Rogers noted that the earlier approach had little advantage over a random lottery, stating, “There are so many people hitting the system at the same time that, in fact, it is random.” (“See Comic-Con Ticket Sales: Systematizing Randomness“)

This year, Comic-Con International decided to randomize the submission of hotel forms as well. Users were given a three-hour window to access an online “waiting room” and then, at the appointed time, were randomly placed in a queue to gain access to the hotel request form.

While this seemed to go well on the day of the hotel sale, there was a great deal of uncertainly about the details, particularly when attendees started getting the results a few days later.

People reported having relatively low numbers in the queue, yet failing to receive any of their hotel selections. Reports filtered in of friends with later spots in the queue getting rooms at popular hotels while people earlier in line got none.

Confusion over Sequence, Timestamp, and Duplication

While those who failed to get the room they wanted were obviously disappointed, much of the frustration arose from confusion about how the process worked.

The early word was that, even with the randomized queue as a gating factor, requests would still be processed in the order of the timestamp when they were submitted. Thus, as in past years, once the form appeared, many raced to complete it as quickly as possible, risking the possibility of making critical errors that would invalidate their submission. After the sale closed, a tweet from onPeak stated that forms would be handled in the order of the user’s assigned place in queue rather than the submission timestamp. Some anecdotal reports seem to contradict this, however, leaving it unclear how the forms were sequenced for processing.

Users were also told that duplicate submissions would not increase the odds of getting a specific hotel and, in fact, it would likely decrease one’s chances since “only the most recent submission received will be the one processed.” What qualified as a “duplicate submission” remains unclear, however, with reports (or speculation) of requests being disregarded for myriad reasons, including forms with the same mailing address, or with the same phone number, or for no apparent reason whatsoever.

A parody Twitter account, “Fake onPeak,” appeared shortly after the sale lampooning the organization behind the process, issuing tweets like: “Reminder: As you call us today, you’ll be placed in a random order. Call twice and we will have to ignore your request.

Hotel Allocation Schemes: Sequence and Preference

Another aspect of the system is unclear: What is the exact method by which hotels are allocated based on people’s sequence in the randomized list and their priority selections?

A common view is that the Comic-Con hotel sale works something like this: People’s requests are first randomly ordered and then the system goes through this list and examines each person’s six selections in the order given to look for an available room.

In other words, the system starts with the first person in the queue. If a room at their first choice hotel is available, they’re allocated that room. If not, the system looks at their second choice. If a room in that hotel is available, they’re granted that room. And so on through the set of their six hotel options. If none of these is available, the system follows the option specified for this situation such assigning the person to another arbitrary (randomly selected?) room on the shuttle route or in any available room. (The details of how this subsequent selection process occurs are also mysterious.)

While this system is simple to understand and relatively easy to implement, it can lead to potentially sub-optimal outcomes. For example, let’s assume that when my slot in the sequence arrives, my first five selections are unavailable and there is one room left at my sixth choice hotel, say, the Omni Hotel. I would get the room at the Omni. If the next person in the randomly-ordered sequence selected the Omni as their first choice, they would not get the room.

You can argue that this is fair, since I was randomly placed ahead of the other person wanting to stay at the Omni. But it’s unfortunate that someone who wants the Omni as their first choice loses out to someone who cares only slightly for that hotel (particularly since the selection was made randomly).

An alternative approach would seek to maximize the overall satisfaction of all participants by following a different algorithm. Rather than looking through all six hotel options for each individual before moving on to the next person, the system could fill each hotel by looking through the ordered list of all the requests by priority first. In other words, start with a hotel (in order of size or popularity — or simply alphabetically), then go through the ordered sequence of users looking for those who made this hotel their first choice before looking at the second-choice selections for this hotel

For example, when looking to fill the rooms at the Hilton Bayfront, look through the ordered list of people to identify those who listed the Bayfront as their first choice. Proceed through the requests in the ordered sequence – looking only at each person’s top choice — until either the Bayfront is filled with people who picked it as their first choice or the end of the list of people is reached. If the system gets to the end of the list of first-choice selections and rooms are still available, it then starts over at the beginning of the list looking for people who selected the Bayfront as their second choice. Continue in this way for each hotel until all the rooms are filled.

This approach would assure that each hotel is filled with those who are most desirous of that location. The randomized sequence would still be important, but it would carry less weight relative to the individual’s prioritization of the hotels.

Until Next Year

Because the demand exceeds the supply — particularly for the popular downtown hotels — there will inevitably be complaints from those who failed to get the room they wanted. But the lack of transparency about how the process works exacerbates the problem. Hopefully, for Comic-Con 2017 attendees will know more about how requests are sequenced, when they might be rejected, and how people’s hotel priorities are allocated.

This year’s Comic-Con International: San Diego takes place July 21 through 24, 2016, with a Preview Night on July 30.

Update 2016 April 13:

The SDCC Unofficial Blog has an update that clarifies some of the issues surrounding this year’s Comic-Con hotel sale, with a few technical details that will no doubt be helpful for next year’s Hotelpocalypse: “CCI, onPeak Offer Insight to San Diego Comic-Con General Hotel Sale 2016.”

Update 2016 April 26:

An analysis of the results of this year’s hotel sale based on data supplied to the Friends of Comic-Con forum provides additional insight into how the process worked: “SDCC 2016 Post Hotel Lottery, a Statistical Analysis.”

New York Comic Con 2015: Recap and Photo Highlights

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The growing enthusiasm for all things pop culture was on display once again this past weekend at New York Comic Con. The sold-out event, run by the ReedPop unit of Reed Exhibitions, a division of RELX Group (formerly Reed Elsevier), drew its largest crowd ever. The event reported an all-time high attendance of 167,000, up from last year’s high of 151,000.

Bigger than Big?

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
This year’s New York Comic Con marked a new attendance record.

Comparisons with other comic cons is difficult, however, due to the lack of a standard method of reporting attendance figures. New York Comic Con apparently tallies the number of people who attend each day to generate their total attendance figure. Comic Con International’s San Diego Comic-Con, on the other hand, reportedly counts each attendee only once, regardless of how many days the person attends. In other words, someone with a four-day badge, who attends all four days, would be counted four times in New York’s tally, but only once in San Diego’s. Thus, although San Diego Comic-Con reports a smaller attendance number of roughly 130,000, the West Coast event likely remains the largest popular culture convention in the U.S.

New York Comic Con is clearly growing, however, this year expanding to an additional venue beyond the Javits Center, adding the 2,200 seat Hammerstein Ballroom for panel sessions.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
The Main Stage wristband line.

The size of the convention was also apparent from the length of the lines at the event. On Saturday morning before the Javits Center opened, the line to enter the building started at 11th Avenue and 38th Street, stretched two blocks up to 40th Street, turned the corner to follow 40th Street down the long crosstown block to 12th Avenue, and then turned down 12th Ave to extend six more blocks down to 34th Street — a total distance of roughly 0.6 miles. Unlike San Diego Comic-Con, which provides different lines for the Hall H and everything else, at New York Comic Con there is initially one line outside the building for everything. When the convention center opened, the line moved briskly, despite the requirement to check bags and scan the RFID chip in each badge. Once inside, the line splits into one for the exhibition hall (or anywhere other than the Main Stage) and multiple separate lines to get a wristband for one of the day’s panels on the Main Stage.

As first implemented last year, the Main Stage auditorium at New York Comic Con is cleared between each panel. This differs from the halls at San Diego Comic-Con (or any of the other rooms at New York Comic Con) which allow audience members to stay for multiple panels. As discussed last year when this policy was first introduced [see “New York Comic Con 2014: Bigger and Better“], this approach is a mixed blessing. While it makes it easier to gain access to the one major panel of your choice, it’s nearly impossible to see any of the other Main Stage panels that day. By contrast, at San Diego Comic-Con gaining entry to Hall H often requires camping out in line for many hours but, once in the room, fans can stay throughout the entire day’s programming. The process at New York Comic Con also means less programming in total, since the scheme requires 45 minutes between panels to clear the room, in contrast to only 15 minutes between most of San Diego’s panel sessions.

Beyond the scale of the event, however, the range and the quality of programming at ReedPop’s New York Comic Con continue to secure the event’s position as the premiere East Coast pop culture event.

Marketing Mania

Marketing is a major thrust of all comic cons — from the presentations by television studios to the vendor booths throughout the exhibition hall, and comic cons often feature creative approaches to advertising to the pop culture crowd.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Jessica Jones marketing: sidewalk graffiti.
New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Mock ads for Nelson and Murdock, Attorneys at Law.

Marvel Television had a significant presence at New York Comic Con this year, with major presentations on their Netflix series Daredevil and Jessica Jones. (More on these below.) These Marvel properties also presented clever viral marketing campaigns outside the walls of the Javits Center. Spray-painted in the style of street art graffiti on the sidewalks around the convention center were messages using the #JessicaJones hashtag along with statements such as “I know your secrets.” (As clever as this is, one wonders about the legality of this defacement of public property.) Elsewhere around the arena were mock ads for the legal services of Nelson and Murdock, the attorneys in Marvel’s Daredevil.

A few years ago it was noteworthy to see companies outside the realm of pop culture exhibiting at a comic con. [See, from 2012: ‘Consumer Brands Go Geek at Comic Con” and, from 2013: “Philadelphia Comic Con: Batman, Buffy and … Bath Fitter?“] No longer. It is now common practice at many of the large, for-profit conventions, such as those run my ReedPop and WizardWorld, to include vendors unrelated to pop culture hawking their products to the comic con crowd. As in past years, Chevrolet was a partner sponsor of this year’s New York Comic Con. Other partner sponsors this year included such wide ranging brands as Honey Nut Cheerios, Courtyard Marriott, and Jelly Belly Candy Company.

Progressive insurance "Protector-corn."
Progressive insurance “Protector-corn.”

One vendor embracing the spirit of con culture was Progressive. The insurance company provided lockers where fans could temporarily store their loot and a charging hub for mobile devices in need of power. More bizarre were the “Protector-corns” — workers dressed as a mashup of company spokesperson Flo and a unicorn — who provided “line insurance” by holding attendees’ places in line while they grabbed food or took a restroom break.

Programming Sessions

While New York Comic Con offers a full array of programming sessions on comic books, games, movies, and cosplay, the event is particularly strong in the depth of its presentations on television programming.

The Librarians and Felicia Day

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
The Librarians panel.

On Friday, the cast and crew of the TNT series The Librarians discussed what to expect in the new season. The panel included actors John Larroquette, Christian Kane, John Kim, Lindy Booth, and Rebecca Romijn, along with Executive Producer Dean Devlin. Following this panel, actor Jeff Hephner showed an extended clip of his upcoming TNT series, Agent X, co-starring Sharon Stone.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Felicia Day.

Following the TNT panels, actor, producer, and writer Felicia Day arrived on the Empire Stage. Fresh off the book tour for her memoir, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost), Day participated in an hour-long audience question and answer session.

Limitless, Colony, and Mr. Robot

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Jake McDorman and Jennifer Carpenter on the Limitless panel.

Later on Friday afternoon, as part of the CBS TV Studios session, the Hammerstein Ballroom hosted a Limitless panel with actors Jake McDorman and Jennifer Carpenter, and Executive Producer Craig Sweeny.

Following the CBS presentations, the Hammerstein Ballroom featured panels for two USA TV series: Colony, scheduled to debut on January 14, 2016, and Mr. Robot, which recently ended its initial 10-episode season.

Carlton Cuse, Josh Holloway, and Ryan Condal.
Colony: Carlton Cuse, Josh Holloway, and Ryan Condal.

The Colony panel featured series co-creators Carlton Cuse and Ryan Condal, along with lead actor Josh Holloway discussing the forthcoming series about a near future in which the citizens of Los Angeles live under the domination of an occupying force. While audience speculation ran rampant about the nature of the mysterious occupiers, Cuse and Condal remained mum on the details. In addition to a Q and A with the creative team, the pilot episode of Colony was screened in full.

Martin Wallström, Rami Malek, Christian Slater, Carly Chaikin, and Portia Doubleday.
Mr. Robot: Martin Wallström, Rami Malek, Christian Slater, Carly Chaikin, and Portia Doubleday.

Much of the audience in the Hammerstein Ballroom that afternoon appeared to be there to see the Mr. Robot panel, which included actors Rami Malek, Christian Slater, Portia Doubleday, Carly Chaikin, and Martin Wallström, and showrunner Sam Esmail, in conversation with Andy Greenwald. While details about season 2 were scant, Esmail indicated the upcoming episodes would turn very dark. Masks of fsociety, the series’ subversive hacker group, were distributed to the audience at the outset of the panel. Near the end of the session, the cast hopped down from the stage to pose in front of the auditorium full of masked fans and take a few quick selfies with audience members.

Daredevil and Jessica Jones

On Saturday, Marvel Television presented a two-part panel on the Main Stage featuring the company’s Netflix series Daredevil and Jessica Jones.

As Marvel Television head Jeph Loeb walked to the podium to introduce the first of the two panels he stopped and said he wanted to do something unscripted. He then dashed off stage and returned briefly with cast members from both shows — Krysten Ritter (Jessica Jones), Charlie Cox (Daredevil) and Mike Colter (Jessica Jones and Luke Cage) — playfully stating this is the most the audience would presently see of The Defenders, an upcoming Netflix Marvel team-up series featuring those characters.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Daredevil‘s Deborah Ann Woll, Charlie Cox, and Elden Henson.

Loeb returned to the stage to introduce the Daredevil panel, with a full list of cast members from season 2: Charlie Cox, Deborah Ann Woll, Elden Henson, Jon Bernthal, and Elodie Yung, along with season 2 showrunners Douglas Petrie and Marco Ramirez (replacing season 1 showrunner Steven DeKnight), and Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada. The panel included a sizzle reel with footage from seasons 1 and 2, including a quick shot of Elodie Yung donning her mask as Elektra that brought cheers from the crowd.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
From Jessica Jones: Jeph Loeb, Krysten Ritter, and Mike Colter.

Following Daredevil, Loeb brought to the stage the cast of Netflix’s next Marvel series, Jessica Jones: actors Krysten Ritter, Mike Colter, Rachael Taylor, Carrie-Anne Moss, Wil Traval, Eka Darville, and Erin Moriarty, and showrunner Melissa Rosenberg.

Missing from the panel was actor David Tennant, who was working in a play in London. Tennant appeared in a brief video segment apologizing for his absence and mentioning that clips from the series would follow. To the initial dismay of the crowd, Loeb explained that Tennant misspoke — they didn’t have clips from Jessica Jones to show. He quickly explained that they didn’t have any clips because they would show, for the first time anywhere, the complete first episode of the series, which elicited an enthusiastic roar from the audience.

Minority Report and DC’s Legends of Tomorrow

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Meagan Good and Stark Sands on the Minority Report panel.

On Sunday, back at the Empire Stage, the Minority Report panel included actors Meagan Good, Wilmer Valderrama, Nick Zano, Stark Sands, Laura Regan, Daniel London, and Li Jun Li.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
DC’s Legends of Tomorrow panel.

As the Minority Report panel ended, it was standing room only as people jammed the room waiting for DC’s Legends of Tomorrow panel with cast members Arthur Darvill, Brandon Routh, and Ciara Renee, and showrunner Phil Klemmer. Given the size of the crowd, the powerhouse programming lineup in this Warner Bros. Television Takeover that began with of DC’s Legends of Tomorrow and included Gotham, Supergirl, Blindspot and Person of Interest would have been better suited for the larger Main Stage.

Creators and Cosplayers

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Comic book artists, writers, and editors.

The Artist Alley at New York Comic Con is one of the best of any pop culture convention. Strolling around the tables of comic book writers, artists, and editors often leads to serendipitous encounters with the men and women who create comic books. Former Marvel Comics Editor-in-Chief Jim Shooter was in attendance for his first comic con in many years. And it was wonderful to see Lumberjanes creators Brooke Allen and Shannon Watters interacting with fans of the critically acclaimed all-ages series. I had conversations with a number of my favorite comic book creators including Empty Zone writer and artist Jason Shawn Alexander, Daredevil artist Lee Weeks, horror illustrator Basil Gogos, Intersect writer and artist Ray Fawkes, The Fifth Beatle author Vivek Tiwary, and many others.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse
Cosplay at New York Comic Con 2015.

Finally, as always, the corridors of he Javits Center were filled with fans in creative costumes of pop culture characters.

For a complete photographic overview of this year’s event, see the Flickr album: New York Comic Con 2015.

New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse New York Comic Con 2015. Photo-by-Kendall-Whitehouse